Welcome - Enjoy Your Visit

 

"A WHITE AFFAIR"

 Summer Fundraising Event

 

  Saturday, July 8, 2017 - Laurel-Beltsville Activity Center

  7120 Contee Rd, Laurel MD 20707

7:00 PM - 12 Midnight

  $65.00 Per Person  

 

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TICKETS

Thanks for visiting our site! Get the latest news on developments and happenings at the St. Andrew High School for Girls. It’s even easier to keep in touch with our new Facebook page and we look forward to expanding our community of alumnae and supporters by means of social networking. Facebook.

Take a 2016 Virtual Tour of the St Andrew High School for Girls, Kingston, Jamaica -   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D-SZyqGnGmk

Watch the St. Andrew Girls Choir sing -"No Woman-No Cry" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SSrYlpD6uBc

We established and continue to maintain a great working relationship with the school. This relationship facilitates our support for student scholarships and travel to athletic events; projects such as equipment purchases, building purchase, one-time and ongoing special projects. Our student successes inspire us to set more ambitious goals for the coming years and to strengthen our commitment to the school. We hope that you will be inspired to join us as we forge ahead to achieve these goals.

CURRENT NEWS

OG Rolande Pryce Lands Top World Bank Job

Rolande Pryce is extremely grateful for the experience she gained, having worked for the Government of Jamaica for more than 10 years. This, she believes, paved the way for her securing the post of portfolio and operations manager for the World Bank’s Office based in Indonesia. In other words, the past student of the St Andrew High School for Girls sits second to the country director in Indonesia, managing the World Bank’s program in the Southeast Asian country, which is the bank’s largest office outside of the World Bank’s Headquarters in Washington, DC.

Before landing the coveted job last December, the 46-year-old applied and was accepted to the World Bank’s highly competitive Legal Associates program in 2006. Simultaneously, she worked as advisory lawyer in the Finance, Private Sector Development and Infrastructure Legal Practice, principally advising on energy operations.

She told The Gleaner, however, that having studied law extensively and worked in many legal organizations, this presented a few hurdles, which she had to maneuver. “World Bank staff are predominantly economists or have sector expertise important for development like health, private sector development, water management, agriculture, among other areas. However, I am a lawyer. That surprises people,” she said, laughing. “Many of the issues critical to development center around economics, and while I have studied economics, it is not my core academic strength. So when I meet new colleagues I know they may wonder if I can really manage a high-level policy dialogue,” Pryce said. She added: “However, I learned the issues and the jargon. I really embraced the challenges and leaned heavily on my experience working in the Jamaican Government. After 10 years, I feel more than comfortable with my work at the [World] Bank.”

Pryce, who managed the bank’s country programs in the Organization of Eastern Caribbean States (OECS) and drafted the World Bank’s OECS Regional Partnership Strategy in 2008, said that she was thankful for the opportunity to aid in the fight in eliminating people’s poverty and boosting prosperity.
“It’s a privilege to work in international development. My job is to help governments solve challenges that will lift people out of poverty. As the fourth most populous country in the world, Indonesia is seen as a very important program. The bank is concerned about poverty alleviation, and extreme poverty in Indonesia is about 11 per cent. This means that in Indonesia approximately 28 million people are living just below the poverty line,” she lamented.

Triathelete Llori Sharpe – Looking to Tokyo 2020, having worked for the Government of Jamaica for more than 10 years. This, she believes, paved the way for her securing the post of portfolio and operations manager for the World Bank’s Office based in Indonesia.
In other words, the past student of the St Andrew High School for Girls sits second to the country director in Indonesia, managing the World Bank’s program in the Southeast Asian country, which is the bank’s largest office outside of the World Bank’s Headquarters in Washington, DC.

Before landing the coveted job last December, the 46-year-old applied and was accepted to the World Bank’s highly competitive Legal Associates program in 2006. Simultaneously, she worked as advisory lawyer in the Finance, Private Sector Development and Infrastructure Legal Practice, principally advising on energy operations.

She told The Gleaner, however, that having studied law extensively and worked in many legal organizations, this presented a few hurdles, which she had to maneuver. “World Bank staff are predominantly economists or have sector expertise important for development like health, private sector development, water management, agriculture, among other areas. However, I am a lawyer. That surprises people,” she said, laughing.

“Many of the issues critical to development center around economics, and while I have studied economics, it is not my core academic strength. So when I meet new colleagues I know they may wonder if I can really manage a high-level policy dialogue,” Pryce said.
She added: “However, I learned the issues and the jargon. I really embraced the challenges and leaned heavily on my experience working in the Jamaican Government. After 10 years, I feel more than comfortable with my work at the [World] Bank.”

Pryce, who managed the bank’s country programs in the Organization of Eastern Caribbean States (OECS) and drafted the World Bank’s OECS Regional Partnership Strategy in 2008, said that she was thankful for the opportunity to aid in the fight in eliminating people’s poverty and boosting prosperity.
“It’s a privilege to work in international development. My job is to help governments solve challenges that will lift people out of poverty. As the fourth most populous country in the world, Indonesia is seen as a very important program. The bank is concerned about poverty alleviation, and extreme poverty in Indonesia is about 11 per cent. This means that in Indonesia approximately 28 million people are living just below the poverty line,” she lamented.


Triathelete Llori Sharpe – Looking to Tokyo 2020

Llori Sharpe accepts the VMBS YOUTH Awards from Courtney Campbell, Group president and CEO during the RJR Sports Foundation Sportsman and Sportswoman of the Year Awards Gala at the Jamaica Pegasus Hotel.

Grade 11 student Llori Sharpe started out as an outstanding swimmer, but later developed a special love for athletics. Having been involved in triathlon since her debut in November 2015, Sharpe has already established herself as one of the faces — if not the face — of the sport locally.

The credentials of the 16-year-old on the regional and international stage has hoisted the country’s flag in the multiple-stage sport, which involves the completion of the three continuous and sequential endurance disciplines. The prospect of greater achievements seems very imminent.
Among her accolades so far are first place finishes at JTA National Triathlon Championship; the inaugural Jewels Resort Biathlon; the mixed relay at Jakes off Road triathlon; and the Orlando Believe Strong Spirit Triathlon in Florida.

She was also the runner-up female at the Inaugural Caribbean 16-17 Age Group Triathlon, where she placed seventh overall and later placed 22nd out of 51 in the female 16-19 age group at the International Triathlon Union (ITU) World Championship Cozumel in Mexico last year.
“The most difficult part is the cycling because it is the longest part of the sport and it is also my most recent addition, but the running comes naturally so I feel comfortable when I run,” the St Andrew High School for Girls student said with a broad smile during a recent interview with the Jamaica Observer.
“But so far it has been great, I have learnt a lot from my experiences abroad and as well from the seniors here and from the knowledge that I have gained I hope to pass it on to other junior athletes so they can develop well in the sport,” she added.

Sharpe’s glowing resume saw her meeting the criteria to be named the Young Outstanding Upcoming Talented Headliner (YOUTH) at the recent RJR Sports Foundation Sportsman and Sportswoman of the Year Awards gala. The award presented by Victoria Mutual Building Society (VMBS), recognizes a young and promising talent of 21 years or younger, who demonstrates the potential for a great future in sports. “This is really amazing and not only does it motivate me to do better, but it also shows that I have made an impact and I have brought awareness to the sport. So it feels really great to have been recognized and I am hoping to better my performances from last year,” a beaming Sharpe noted. “I have a few triathlon events that I hope to participate in there is one in February in Cuba and I also made the National Cross Country team to Orlando in March. “There is a CAMTRI (Central American Triathlon Union) event in Barbados in April and I also got invited by the US triathlon Association to compete in their National Championships in August and hopefully I will get a chance to compete in the world championships again this year in Rotterdam, Netherlands,” she continued.





 










 

 

A Joyous Gift from the 90th Anniversary Homecoming Celebrations

A check for $2.5 Million raised from events and from alumnae and corporate donations will make a difference to the completion of the Margaret Gartshore Hall and the School’s capital development.m Handing over the check recently to an appreciative principal Sharon Reid (center) are SAHS Foundation Board Chair Dr. Deanna Ashley (2nd left) and St. Andrew Old Girls Association (SAOGA) President Sally Carter (2nd right) with SAOGA immediate past president and current Vice President, Membership, Petagaye Givans (right) a and SAOGA Vice President, Finance Nicole Marshall-Walker (left).

The 90th Anniversary Homecoming Week was celebrated by many alumnae, sponsors and friends April 10–16 this year under the theme – Enriched, Empowered, Abounding in God’s Favour. The culminating event of the week was the Gala in the Garden and Award Ceremony held at Devon House.
SAHS celebrates the anniversary of the School’s founding in 1925 every 5 years. The 95th anniversary will be celebrated in 2020-21.
 

Memorial To Lilieth Osment Brown 

 

Lilieth Osment Brown was a serving member of the St Andrew Old Girls Association executive with unbroken service since 1954. During her Presidency the Association started the Welfare Program and the four year need based Scholarship, both of which continue today.

If her small trim, energetic figure is not familiar to you that’s because you have either never attended an Old Girls event or only attended the one or two that Lil missed. At least you should recognize that breezy, lilting voice, with its no nonsense tone over the telephone. “Lil here – have you bought your tickets yet? – You coming to meeting on Tuesday? –I need some spot prizes for Valentine’s Luncheon.” By the time you hang up you have committed to doing something for St Andrew High School.

Lil will always be remembered for her unparalleled loyalty to her beloved alma mater. Our hearts go out to her daughters Daria (SAHS OG) and Michelle on their loss. We will miss you Lil. You were our living history book, our mother, teacher and ffriend. Our meetings and events will not be the same without you. RIP.




Fond Memories of SAHS From a Gibraltar Camp Refugee

The link between St Andrew High and the Gibraltar Camp refugees was recently brought to light when Old Girl Inez Baker nee Schpektor visited the school for which she had such fond memories.

A Reunion in the Emrie James Museum – Gibraltar Camp refugee Inez Baker (center) and 1943 classmates Dr. Pauline Christie (right) and Anna Maria Hendriks (far left).

The Gibraltar Camp, now the site of UWI Mona, was set up in World War II as an evacuation camp for some 1,500 Gibraltarans (hence its name) and later as an internment camp for Jewish refugees escaping Hitler’s holocaust. The land was covered by row after row of wooden huts with a few commodes here and there.

Inez Baker née Schpektor was one of the Jewish children at the Gibraltar Camp. She recently revisited her old school and in the e Emrie James Museum, much to the delight of some of her classmates recalled with great fondness her St Andrew days. The remarkable chapter of Jewish internment in Jamaica, including Inez’s memories of Jamaica and St Andrew has been captured by yet another Old Girl, York University Professor Diana Cooper-Clarke – Dreams of Re-Creation in Jamaica: The Holocaust, Internment, Jewish Refugees in Gibraltar Camp, Jamaican Jews and Sephardim. The photograph of Inez in her uniform is taken from the book.